Here’s How to Beat a Speeding Ticket


Speeding

If you ever get a speeding ticket, don’t assume you have to pay up. There are ways of beating that ticket. Keep reading to find out how.

10. Wave Hello

Waving Hello
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If you’re driving over the speed limit and happen to spot a police car hidden behind some bushes, the first thing you should do is wave at the officer. According to Reader’s Digest, a former cop said that waving hello is the smartest thing you can do at that moment. That’s because the officer will do one of two things: 1) he’ll wave back because he thinks you two probably know each other, or 2) he’ll think you’re acknowledging you were speeding and are now going to slow down.

9. Be Polite

Polite
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As the old adage goes, “You get more flies with honey than you do with vinegar.” So, if waving hello doesn’t work and you get pulled over anyway, don’t argue with the officer. Instead, make small talk. Ask them how their day is going. Engage in conversation, and make sure you keep a pleasant tone. Cops are human like everyone else, and they want to be treated as such. “A lot of the time when people make small talk and have somewhat of a conversation it humanizes the people we’re dealing with and makes it harder for us to give someone a ticket,” an officer on Reddit said, according to Reader’s Digest.

TIP: Don’t be afraid to cry. If the officer’s in a good mood, explain your situation and let him or her know you’re sorry. Sometimes, they’ll give you a warning instead of a ticket, Daniel Bouchard, a business owner in Dallas, told Forbes.

8. Never Admit to Anything

Shh
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While this may sound like something guys tell each other to say if they ever get caught cheating, it’s actually good advice to follow when possibly getting slapped with a speeding ticket. The last thing you want to say to the officer after he or she pulls you over is, “I’m sorry I was speeding.” According to Reader’s Digest, one former cop says admitting guilt will give the officer ammunition to use against you in court if you plan on contesting the ticket.

Also, don’t plead guilty in court either. “They’re going to accept your guilty plea, you’re going to get what’s coming to you, and that’s the way it is,” Bonnie Sesolak, the former development director for the National Motorists Association, said in an article published by Forbes.

7. Drive a Car That Shows You’re a Law-Abiding Citizen

Front Of Car
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The same way people are often judged by the clothes they wear, officers sometimes judge a person by the car they drive. If your car is flashy, dirty, cluttered, and has bumper stickers that say how much you hate the police or that promote violence, that makes you a target. Other things that can cause police to target you are tinted windows, neon undercarriage lights, spoilers, and other add-ons. While they don’t always mean something bad, tinted windows can sometimes say that you’re trying to hide something from the police.

6. Get Caught in Brooklyn

Brooklyn Bridge
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According to the New York Post, one of the best ways to beat a speeding ticket is to get caught speeding in Brooklyn. That’s because in 2017, the conviction rate (57 percent, by the way) at the Brooklyn South traffic court in Coney Island was the lowest in the city for three years straight! Matthew Weiss, a veteran traffic court lawyer, told the New York Post that the Brooklyn South judges are “fair and they listen.” Of seven cases that were heard in the court in July 2017, a judge declared six of the drivers not guilty.

TIP: Avoid getting caught in Staten Island. The court there consistently has the highest conviction rate in the city.

5. Do Your Research

Google
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First things first–know the speed limit in the state in which you’re driving. Does the state have absolute or presumed speed limits? In other words, is it okay to go over the speed limit by a few miles (presumed speed limits) or does going over the limit by even one mile (absolute speed limits) mean you’ve broken the law?

Also, if you have a GPS system in your car, use it to download additional Points-of-Interest (POI) software so you’ll know when you’re approaching traffic lights that are connected to cameras.

Something else you can do is to learn where the speed traps are in your area. Using a radar detector is also important. Just as important is knowing the kind of radar gun the police used if you should happen to get a ticket. That’s because there have been numerous times when radar guns have produced inaccurate readings, former police officer Roy Reyer says, according to BGR.com. So, if the one the officer used to cite you is one of the faulty ones, it’s possible that you could get off the hook. TIP: To find out what radar gun he or she used, asked them to show it to you. If they don’t, you can always find the type of radar gun listed on your citation.

4. Check for Errors

Inconsistencies
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Did you know that if your ticket contains factual errors, such as a misspelled name, incorrect license plate number, or other inaccurate information, you could possibly get your ticket dismissed? Even minor details such as the color of your car or the time you were ticketed could result in a dismissal if that information is incorrect. Having no correct speed limit sign posted within a reasonable distance of where you were pulled over is also grounds for dismissal. NOTE: The distance varies by state, but it’s usually within a quarter of a mile from where you were pulled over.

TIP: You can also file a discovery request to check for inconsistencies. Filing such a request will release to you the information–type of radar gun, position of the police cruiser, etc.–the prosecution plans on using against you in your case.

3. Consider Deferred Adjudication

Delayed
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If you’ve got a good driving record, deferred adjudication may be a viable option for you. Here’s how it works: Deferred adjudication delays your case for a certain period of time, for example, up to one year. During this time, you’ll be placed on probation. If you meet certain requirements during the probationary period, for example, not getting any additional moving violations, the ticket will be dismissed. Keep in mind that not all cases are eligible for deferred adjudication. You should also keep in mind that you’ll still be responsible for certain fees and court costs.

2. Consult a Lawyer

Attorney Nameplate
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If you’re unsure how to approach this situation, talk to a lawyer, or consider hiring one. This is especially helpful if you have a less-than-spotless driving record. And, make sure you hire someone who specializes in traffic citations. A knowledgeable lawyer could end up getting the judge to dismiss the ticket altogether, or at the very least reduce any associated fines and waive points from your license. If you can’t afford a lawyer, you can always contact an advocacy group like the National Motorists Association. They offer free advice on fighting speeding tickets via hotline.

1. Request a Continuance

To Be Continued
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If all else fails and you end up in court anyway, don’t fret. That battle isn’t over just yet! Believe it or not, there are still ways you can get out of it. One way is to ask the judge for a continuance. According to Reader’s Digest, some people who’ve successfully dodged tickets say that the more time you put between your ticket and your court date, the better. “Imagine how many people an officer pulls over in a month. How many of them do you think he’ll remember six months from now, especially if you take your ticket quietly and move on?,” the magazine wrote. “Getting a continuance also increases the probability that the ticketing officer retires, transfers to another department, or just doesn’t show up for your court date. In almost all of these extenuating situations, the case against you will be dropped,” the magazine added.

FYI, you can request more than one continuance, within reason of course.

CONCLUSION

Have you ever fought a speeding ticket and won? How’d you do it? Let us know in the comments below. We’d love to hear about it! Thanks for reading, and drive carefully.

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